While shrimp may be small in size, they are huge in terms of nutritional value and the health benefits they offer. All over Albanian coast especially in the south you can find freshly caught shrimp at a very affordable cost.

Due to their freshness, shrimps are listed among ten must-try meals in Albania for the tourists.

Being located right on the Ionian Sea, it comes as no surprise that fresh seafood is popular with tourists and locals mainly in South Albania. The fishermen sell their catch early in the morning, so if you want to take a peek at the fish on offer, head there around 9:00 and check it out. Dining seaside while feasting on freshly caught shrimp is a must.

Loaded with protein, vitamin D, vitamin B3, and zinc, shrimp are an excellent, carbohydrate-free food for anyone determined to shed off pounds. Zinc supplementation of zinc deficient subjects has been shown to increase the levels of circulating leptin. Leptin is a hormone that plays a key role in regulating the body's energy expenditure, fat storage, and appetite. Insufficient leptin levels are believed to be the primary cause of food cravings, overeating, and obsession with food. The iodine in shrimp is good for the proper functioning of the thyroid gland which controls the basal metabolic rate, or the rate at which the body consumes energy at rest. Iodine deficiency can result in sluggish thyroid activity which in turn can lead to weight gain or hinder weight loss.

Shrimp can be a unique source of the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory carotenoid nutrient astaxanthin. It is possible for a single 4-ounce serving of shrimp to contain 1-4 milligrams of astaxanthin. In animal studies, astaxanthin has been shown to provide antioxidant support to both the nervous system and musculoskeletal system. In addition, some animal studies have shown decreased risk of colon cancer to be associated with astaxanthin intake, as well as decreased risk of certain diabetes-related problems.

At 56 micrograms in every 4 ounces, shrimp is an excellent source of the antioxidant mineral selenium. Recent research studies show that the selenium contained in shrimp can be well absorbed into the human body. Since selenium deficiency has been shown to be a risk factor for heart failure and other forms of cardiovascular disease, as well as for other problems including type 2 diabetes, compromised cognitive function, and depression, shrimp may have a unique role to play in your meal plan if your health history places you at special risk in any of these areas.

A second mineral benefit often overlooked in shrimp is its unusual concentration of copper. Not only does shrimp rank as a very good source of copper, but it is also our only fish to achieve this very good rating. Several recent studies show the copper richness of shrimp to be a standout among other fish. Researchers have pointed to a copper-containing protein in shrimp called hemocyanin as a likely reason for shrimp's unique copper richness. This copper-containing protein is involved is the shrimp's oxygen metabolism.
Shrimp is often included on the "avoid" list for persons wanting to minimize their dietary intake of cholesterol. The 220 milligrams of cholesterol contained in a 4-ounce serving of shrimp makes this approach a legitimate concern. However, despite its high cholesterol content, several recent research studies have noted some desirable aspects of the fat profile in shrimp. One of these desirable aspects is shrimp's omega-3 fat content.

How to Select and Store

Just as with any seafood, it is best to purchase shrimp from a store that has a good reputation for having a fresh supply. Get to know a fishmonger (person who sells the seafood) at the store so that you can have a trusted resource from whom you can purchase your seafood.

Fresh shrimp should have firm bodies that are still attached to their shells. They should be free of black spots on their shell since this indicates that the flesh has begun to break down. In addition, the shells should not appear yellow or gritty as this may be indicative that sodium bisulfate or another chemical has been used to bleach the shells.

Smell is a good indicator of freshness; good quality shrimp have a slightly saltwater smell. Since a slightly "off" smell cannot be detected through plastic, if you have the option, purchase displayed shrimp as opposed to those that are prepackaged.

Once the fishmonger wraps and hands you the shrimp that you have selected, smell them through the paper wrapping and return them if they do not smell right. When fresh shrimp have been left out for too long, some people describe them as having an "ammonia" smell.

Color can also be an indicator of poor fresh shrimp quality. Unless you are purchasing spotted or striped shrimp, you should not see dark spots or rings of any kind. These markings are usually a sign of deterioration.

When storing any type of seafood, including shrimp, it is important to keep it cold since seafood is very sensitive to temperature./AgroWeb.org